Wrecked by E.R. Frank

WreckedOne of the saddest things human beings endure is death of a loved one. While the idea of our own death may frighten and sadden us, living through the death of someone else, someone close to us, is the saddest thing of all. So imagine Anna’s pain when she awakes from the horrific car accident she was in with her friend Ellen to discover that Ellen is alive—but the girl in the other car, the car that hit them—that girl is dead. That girl was Cameron Polk. Anna’s brother’s girlfriend. Now Anna is questioning everything about herself and her life. The accident wasn’t her fault, but will she ever be able to think of herself as anyone but the girl who killed Cameron? And what must her brother be feeling? Does he hate her? How can he not? Thoughts like these whirl through Anna’s head constantly after the accident, and if she tries to drive or hears someone scream, she immediately finds herself brought right back to that terrible night. With the help of a caring therapist named Frances, Anna discovers she has Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Frances introduces Anna to a new kind of therapy called Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) which allows Anna to internally watch movies of her life stream by and she just has to notice how those memories tie into her feelings about the night of the accident, her brother, and somewhat surprisingly, her feelings about her domineering father. As Anna makes her long journey back from that night, she discovers that there is so much more to her and her relationships with her family and friends than she ever imagined. This is a story of immense grief. But it is also a story of redemption, love and hope, the way only one of my all time fav authors E.R. Frank can tell it. “Mostly you realize you can handle it. You’d rather turn it upside down and dump it out…You’d rather do that, because you don’t want to have to handle it…But you do handle it. Because the thing you learn is that you can.” (2 weepies)

7 thoughts on “Wrecked by E.R. Frank

  1. The most fascinating thing about this book, for me at least, was the fact that Anna’s father is almost exactly like mine.

    Very good recommendation, again.

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