Archive for December, 2016

2016 Top Five


2016
12.29



Dear Teen Peeps,

In years past, I have faithfully posted a Top Ten Books list. But this year, I haven’t read nearly as much YA as I wanted to/should have, due to number of tedious reasons, the main one being that I was was supes busy working on many other adult-ish writing/reviewing projects. (Adulting. So boring, yet so necessary. You’ll see what I mean soon enough.)  So here is a leaner, meaner list of my top five best YA reads of 2016. I mean, I could have dragged the list out to ten, but that would have taken away from the absolute awesomeness of these five, utterly top-notch books. Please note that there has been absolutely no attempt to balance this list by age, gender or genre. These are just my “from-the-gut” favorites of the books I read this year. (Also, The Underground Railroad was not published as a YA book, but is a book that in my opinion, all YAs should read) Click on the title to go right to the review.
 

Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina

 
The Passion of Dolssa by Julie Berry
 

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
 

The Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
 

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

This is the Part Where You Laugh by Peter Brown Hoffmeister


2016
12.22


Travis isn’t laughing much this summer. He lives in a trailer with his beloved grandma, who has terminal cancer. His grandpa is high all the time on his grandma’s medicinal marijuana. He searches the streets weekly for his mother, a homeless drug addict, and dreams of giving her all his saved landscaping money for a down payment on an apartment. When he’s not working, he’s performing endless basketball drills to prove to Coach that he’s not just a former juvie with an anger management problem, but a dedicated baller who deserves to be on the varsity team in the fall. Basketball and his best friend Creature are the only things that keep Travis going when everything else is falling apart. Then Travis meets Natalie. And for a moment, his life seems to be taking a turn for the better. But kids like Travis and Creature know that there’s no guarantees in a world where grandmas suffer, dads disappear, moms care more about drugs than their children, and Mr. Tyler down the street can get away with calling Creature, “a dirty coon.” But they’re going to do their best, not only to survive, but thrive. Even if that means shooting free throws eight hours a day, or pissing on Mr. Tyler’s porch when he’s not home. Because like Natalie, who ‘s fighting her own personal demons, says, “This is the part where you laugh. You just have to. When things are so shitty that there’s nothing you can do, there’s no other way to react.” It’s a pleasure to read a story about down-and-out teens that subverts stereotypes and provides an in-depth and heartbreaking look at how addiction fractures families.  While this fresh novel will probably make you cry more than laugh, its a strong testimony to the power of hope and the resilience of the human spirit.

Scythe by Neal Shusterman


2016
12.17


In the future, humans have managed to eliminate poverty, disease, war, crime and even death. Any physical pain or injury is healed through “nanites” in the blood, and all wants and needs are provided for through the Thunderhead, a god-like global cloud computer that benignly monitors life and keeps everyone safe and content. But since no one dies of natural causes and aging is a choice, there are a select group of humans called Scythes (like, you know, the Grim Reaper?) who must kill or “glean” a certain percentage of people in order to keep the population in check. Once gleaned, those unlucky souls stay dead–unlike the vast majority, for whom death is a reversible state that only requires a four day hospital stay and comes with a delicious ice cream sundae upon discharge. Citra and Rowan are two ordinary teens who are chosen to become apprentice Scythes, and both are understandably reluctant. But once they see the compassion, responsibility and intellect the job requires, they begin to grow and evolve in ways they never would imagined had they simply lived safe, quiet, eternal lives under the Thunderhead.  But when the selfish whim of a power-hungry Scythe pits them against each other, they not only have to save themselves but all of humankind from a new breed of killer. This absorbing and utterly fascinating take on dystopian lit. is bound to resonate deeply not only Hunger Game and Giver readers, but any teen or adult who’s feeling adrift in American’s uncertain landscape post- election. I couldn’t help but see Scythe Goddard, a thin-skinned, flamboyantly dressed, limo-loving megalomaniac and Scythe Curie, a proud, wise, measured aesthete, as metaphors for certain presidential candidates! (But see what you think. It’s entirely possible I’m just still feeling really, really crabby.) If you’re looking for a captivating, end of year read that delivers both edge-of-your-seat action and philiosophical perspective, then add Scythe to your holiday reading list.

Saving Red by Sonya Sones


2016
12.11

 

Ever since her older brother Noah disappeared, Molly feels like she doesn’t have a friend in the world except her service dog Pixel. So when Red, a fun-loving homeless teen and Christo, a super cute new guy, come into her life on the same day, she feels as though she’s hit the jackpot. There’s just two small problems: 1) Red suffers from schizoaffective disorder, which means she hears voices and sometimes sees things that aren’t there, 2) It’s nearly Christmas, and Christo has to leave the morning after their first date to fly to New York with his family for the holidays. Molly, whose parents have become zombies since her brother left, is determined to give Red the kind of holiday her family used to have before they fell apart. So while Christo is in New York, she tries desperately to worm Red’s real address or home phone number out of her in order to tell her mother that she’s okay. But when Red starts taking in earnest to the voices in her head, and Christo suddenly stops texting, Molly is forced to ask her checked-out parents for help and finally come to terms with what really happened to Noah. This heartfelt verse novel, full of bigger-than-life characters and surprising twists, is classic Sonya Sones. If you’re in the mood for a feel-good novel, complete with holiday cheer and sincere emotion, look no further. It’s the perfect gift to give or get any teen reader this holiday season.

Contact

Jen Hubert Swan
Librarian, Book Reviewer,
Reading Addict
swampophelia27@yahoo.com